Last edited by Shar
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of Unitarianism in the Antebellum South found in the catalog.

Unitarianism in the Antebellum South

the other invisible institution

by John Allen Macaulay

  • 17 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Southern States
    • Subjects:
    • Unitarianism -- Southern States -- History -- 18th century.,
    • Unitarianism -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century.,
    • Southern States -- Church history -- 18th century.,
    • Southern States -- Church history -- 19th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-211) and index.

      StatementJohn Allen Macaulay.
      SeriesReligion and American culture, Religion and American culture (Tuscaloosa, Ala.)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBX9833.43 .M23 2001
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiii, 222 p. :
      Number of Pages222
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6777694M
      ISBN 10081731086X
      LC Control Number00012599

      The latter is the case of Unitarianism in the ante-bellum South. New Englanders found in Richmond, New Orleans, and Charles-ton a native brand of liberal, unorthodox religion in the first quarter of the nineteenth century which they imbued with Unitarianism and which they attempted to foster and nurture in. Book and tract societies provided a significant service for Unitarianism in South Carolina and Georgia. These tracts were not mere one-or two-page missals passed out on street corners. Rather they were generally pamphlets and sometimes even bound volumes of Unitarian sermons and theological writings.

        The Antebellum South in the Reformation Tradition. If a book claiming to be a revelation from God, by any fair interpretation defended slavery, or placed it on the same basis as the relation of husband and wife, parent and child, guardian and ward, such a book would not and could not be received by the mass of mankind as a Divine revelation. Lydia Maria Francis Child (born Lydia Maria Francis) (Febru – Octo ), was an American abolitionist, women's rights activist, Native American rights activist, novelist, journalist, and opponent of American expansionism.. Her journals, both fiction and domestic manuals, reached wide audiences from the s through the s. At times she shocked her audience as she Occupation: abolitionist, women's rights activist, .

      Jeff Kinard, Lafayette of the South: Prince Camille de Polignac and the American Civil War. John Lear, Workers, Neighbors, and Citizens: The Revolution in Mexico City. John Lynch, Latin America Between Colony and Nation: Selected Essays. John Allen Macaulay, Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: The Other Invisible Institution. a phrase used by whites in the antebellum South to refer to slavery without using the word slavery. moved south and west during the first half of the nineteenth century. was an area where cotton was grown at a fast rate. Unitarianism. abandoned the concept of the trinity that had long been central to the Christian faith.


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Unitarianism in the Antebellum South by John Allen Macaulay Download PDF EPUB FB2

"John Macaulay sculpts the southern face of antebellum American Unitarianism with clarity, empathy, and discernment. Macaulay's almost startling portrait resurrects one of the South's most elusive, itriguing spiritual groups even as it illustrates Unitarainism's unexpected adaptability in the South and the region's intriguing spiritual by: 3.

John Macaulay's model study of Unitarianism in the antebellum south reestablishes the denomination's position as an influential religious movement in the early history of the region. By looking at benevolent societies, lay meetings, professional and civic activity, ecumenical interchange, Author: John Allen Macaulay.

He shows that there were in fact two invisible religious institutions in the antebellum South, one in the slave quarters and the other in the urban landscape of southern towns.

Whereas slave preachers rediscovered in music and bodily movement and in themes of suffering a vibrant Christian community, Unitarians witnessed the simple spiritual Cited by: 3. "John Macaulay sculpts the southern face of antebellum American Unitarianism with clarity, empathy, and discernment.

Macaulay's almost startling portrait resurrects one of the South's most elusive, itriguing spiritual groups even as it illustrates Unitarainism's unexpected adaptability in the South and the region's intriguing spiritual diverisity. : Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: The Other Invisible Institution (Religion & American Culture) eBook: Macaulay, John Allen: Kindle StoreCited by: 3.

Unitarianism in the Antebellum South. by John Allen Macaulay. Religion & American Culture. Share your thoughts Complete your review. Tell readers what you thought by rating and reviewing this book. Rate it * You Rated it *Brand: University of Alabama Press. Get this from a library. Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: the other invisible institution.

[John Allen Macaulay] -- "John Macaulay's model study of Unitarianism in the antebellum South reestablishes the denomination's position as an influential religious movement. Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: the other invisible institution.

Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University Alabama Press,© xiii, pages: Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: John Allen Macaulay.

Unitarianism in South Carolina had several religious and philosophical sources: an indigenous Arminianism, commonsense realism, Anglican latitudinarianism, and English and New England Unitarianism.

During the antebellum period, southern Unitarians neutralized the more radical elements in all of these sources and created a core of “rational. Buy Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: The Other Invisible Institution by Mr.

John Allen Macaulay online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 2 editions - starting at $ Shop now. First Lessons on the Bible, Written for His Sunday School in Worcester by Hall, Edward.

Boston: Unitarian Sunday-School Society, Hard Cover. Good+/No Jacket. Binding is tight. Cover shows moderate rubbing and is bumped at edges. Text is tight, clean, and unmarked. Surprisingly little discoloration of pages.

The Religion and American Culture book series by multiple authors includes books The Churches of Christ in the 20th Century: Homer Hailey's Personal Journey of Faith (Religion & American Culture), Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: The Other Invisible Institution (Religion & American Culture), Show Us How You Do It: Marshall Keeble and the Rise of Black Churches of Christ in the United.

Evangelical Christianity was certainly the most powerful religious movement in the antebellum United States, but it was not the only one. Throughout New England, many Christians began to espouse Unitarianism, a sect based on the importance of human reason.

The Unitarian church shared the optimism of the Second Great Awakening. Gilman’s tireless efforts helped establish Unitarianism as a viable religion in South Carolina and the South, while his religious and secular writings put him at the center of Charleston literary circles. On February 9,Gilman died suddenly in Kingston, Massachusetts, while on a visit to New England.

John Allen Macaulay's Unitarianism in the Antebellum South: The Other Invisible Institution challenges the belief that Unitarians played only a minor part in Southern society in the half-century before the American Civil War.

Macaulay tells the story of the rise and fall of liberal churches in the South, but the real insight of the book is Macaulay's portrait of the "less visible forms of. The Dark Sun Rises: Slavery and Education in the Antebellum South Denise Williamson's historical novel, The Dark Sun Rises, takes on the dark period of American history, of slavery in the South.

Set in Charleston, South Carolina in the s, this first book in the "Roots of Faith" series chronicles the story of a young African slave, Joseph. Joseph Priestley and English Unitarianism in America J.

Bowers “This beautifully and persuasively written account of the contributions of Joseph Priestley and English Unitarianism to the development of liberal religious thought in nineteenth-century America offers a valuable contribution to the growing historiography on the transatlantic exchange of ideas in the early republic and on the.

According to Wikipedia: "Unitarianism as a theology is the belief in the single personality of God, in contrast to the doctrine of the Trinity (three persons in one God).[1] It is the philosophy upon which the modern Unitarian movement was based, and, 4/5.

Macaulay’s book traces the prominence of Unitarians in cities like New Orleans, pictured here, in the antebellum South. At the time his book was published, he was an independent scholar and “didn’t have the academic platform to adequately promote it,” he said.

highly educated. Many of the churches in New England, where Unitarianism originated in the colonies and where it is still most predominant, are descended from Congregationalist churches.

Universalism, on the other hand, was a more rural movement, composed primarily of less-educated, working-class people. Irving published Knickerbockers History of New York in which had interesting caricatures of the Dutch. Washington Irving's The Sketch Book, published inwas an immediate success.

This book made Irving world renown. The Sketch Book was influenced by both American and English themes, and therefore popular in the Old and New World.cline near the end of the antebellum era.

As such his book somewhat be-lies its own title by demonstrating that Unitarianism was anything but "invisible" in important urban areas of the South, such as Charleston and New Orleans.

Admittedly, southern Unitarianism had to struggle to sur-vive in a religious climate that grew increasingly evangelical.This book will help the reader to understand the contemporary liberal religion of Unitarian Universalism in a historical and global context.

Andrea Greenwood and Mark W. Harris challenge the view that the Unitarianism of New England is indigenous and the point from which the religion by: 5.